High-protein products, in particular high-protein bars, are not as healthy as perceived by consumers, while there is no conclusive evidence to suggest that consumption of protein above the recommended intake levels provides healthy individuals with additional health benefits, says a report. The report revealed that chocolate is the main ingredient in almost 40% of the protein bars it surveyed, with many also being high in saturated fat and containing added sugar and salt. The research also found that over 1 in 3 people (37%) surveyed think protein bars are ‘healthy’. However, when comparing current protein intakes among adults with what’s recommended, both men and women are already consuming more protein than they need from their diet. High-protein bars are comparable to a standard chocolate bar in their calorie, fat, saturated fat, and salt content. Safefood investigated the benefits of consuming extra dietary protein. Its research looked at the nutritional content of 83 high-protein snack foods and drinks available for sale in supermarkets on the island of Ireland. These foods included protein bars, yoghurts, yoghurt-style products and milk drinks. There is no consistent or conclusive evidence to suggest that consumption of protein above the recommended intake levels provides healthy individuals with additional health benefits.

Source: foodnavigator.com

Lightbulb Moment: Unless you are a competitive athlete, there is no benefit to additional protein in the diet.  But what you can gain from a high protein diet is kidney damage, impaired cognitive function, constipation, and bone loss.

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